• Afro Social Centric

Black Journal: A Love Letter Reminder To Black Women


'Transcultural Expression' by Ghanaian artist Wiz Kudowor


Why a love letter reminder to black women you ask?!


Well, not only are we in a global pandemic, but we are also experiencing a second pandemic – a racial one. In the midst of those two, there is a third one. I implore you to take a moment to Google “the shadow pandemic.” Educate yourself, then please continue reading this letter. I want to address the shadow pandemic by speaking to the power of black women, not to nullify the experiences of other women for they are just as relevant but because, I am a black woman and I can only speak from that perspective.


There are moments this past year where I have had to dig deep and unearth the magic found within being black. Black and proud! A black woman who holds power in her two hands! As society has proven time and time again, as black women, we are already operating from a place of disadvantage by virtue of the colour of our skin and sex. So, we have had to work a lot harder for that door to open. We have had to speak a little louder to be heard (and hope we will not be labelled “an angry black woman”). To fit in, in places that are not colourful, we have at times dimmed our lights and subdued our presence. But this is not what our ancestors fought for. This is not what generations past sacrificed for. This letter is a loving reminder to you and to me…



My dearest black women…

No matter where you come from you are royalty! Yes, you are… You were birthed from the depths of Mother Earth, from the cradle of Africa, roots deep in the soil where the ancestors stepped foot…skin like magic, glistening like gold. A body so precious — a treasure trove of the continent’s hidden jewels… cascading in melanated cocoa, enameled by beauty’s journey. You are adorned with a coveted crown because let’s never forget, we did not begin as slaves, our ancestors were queens once before.

You have a lineage of royalty evidenced in each bold step you unleash into the world — a force of nature wherever you go. A light. A compass. A mover and shaker. A giver of life with legacy etched in your hands… You are the blueprint for the future you imagine, for the generations to come!

My God, you are a black woman!


Wúndíá, 2016 by ÀSÌKÒ


Every step you take wherever you are, near and far, someone, an ancestor… fought, sacrificed and paved the way that you could take up space. So dear black woman, take up that space and own it! Every room you walk into, you are meant to be in. You are not responsible for someone else’s reaction to you, their ignorance or naiveté. If the colour of your skin or the power you possess intimidates or makes one uncomfortable – it is not for you to address. Stand tall and keep strutting! Not walk. Strut!


“There is no glory found in playing small. Constantly trying to lessen yourself, when in fact, all that you should be full of, is you. Overflowing in every sense.” -Nomzamo Mbatha


You are dripping in brilliance. Hard work is in your DNA. Superwoman not a descriptor but the embodiment of your being. Your words are power and meaning. Somehow, someway, you stand victorious on mountain peaks because you bend and do not break at life’s challenges. Your ability to rise and conquer flows in your blood. You are the kind of woman who goes to war even after a long-hard day under the sun’s scorching heat for what and whom you believe in.

You are both water and fire, warrior and army for you black woman, can go

“forth alone and stand as ten thousand.”

My God, you are a black woman and that is your power! Here’s to you being everything destiny has called you to be. Here’s to you being unconditionally loved. Here’s to you being treated with all fairness! Here’s to you being seen as the brilliant, phenomenal woman you are! May the kings and men in your life treat you as such. May the world see the essence in you because you are a black woman and that is your superpower!


Sincerely,

Tatenda Mhaka

A Black Woman

All opinions expressed in this post are that of the author and do not necessarily express the opinions of Afro Social Centric.